For a World Free of Human Exploitation and Inequities

Combats trafficking and sexual exploitation of women and children with holistic regional projects that include preventive actions and direct support for victims.

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Hello, We are Alliance Anti Trafic

AAT has been working in Southeast Asia since 2001, focusing on causes and effects of sexual exploitation, abuse and human trafficking

We restore the hope of our beneficiaries thanks to the build-up of a chain of solidarity among all persons involved in our program

Children help children, children help adults, adults help children. People who have more experience help the ones who has less experience.
We are a NGO created by peers and we are continuously applying this concept in our work
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We do not consider corruption as an acceptable solution to reach our goal. We are uncompromising and we do not deal with immoral and unacceptable solutions. We never lie and cheat children or adults. We always recognize and mention all the agencies and people who have played a role in our work and actions.

"The world will not be destroyed by those who do the evil, but by those who watch them without doing anything"

Albert Heinstein

As long as we remember we share one future,
we will survive.

Geostorm

We not just act without an understanding of our field. We organize and publish regularly studies and researches to better understand the situation to adapt our work.

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We are a
peer-based
NGO
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Our Impact in Southeast Asia
+ 0
trafficked people supported. Women Children & men
+0
people trained on prevention. Children and officials
+ 0
sex surrogates supported. Including 10% of children
+ 0
girls received scholarships. Including 20% of appatrides

We are a small sized NGO that we like to keep on a human scale. AAT was created by Thai, Vietnamese and French with the help of Cambodian and Malaysian. AAT is a local NGO, registered in France and in Thailand.
Our impressive results were achieved with small budgets.

Our work is effective but insufficient

Without your help, we can not succeed
HELP US MAKE MORE IMPACT

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I believe that
my future
is bright
Many kids like Daffodil need your
help to believe in their future
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ANGELA DAVIS

"I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change
I am changing the things I cannot accept"
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You are called to do something BIG. Say YES and HELP US to transform lives, to offer security, happiness and hope for children and women.

Be a Changemaker
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Alliance Anti Trafic is smart. transparent. efficient. visible. innovative. impactive. inventive. sustainable. impartial. professional. the NGO you expect.
our work
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4R’s meaning Rescue, Repatriation, Rehabilitation and Reintegration for victims of trafficking and persons involved in prostitution, children, women or men. AAT organizes their rescue, their repatriation to their original country, their reintegration on the community, offers services and follows up
What is "4rs" action?
HUMAN TRAFFICKING
The 4rs Actions
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AAT focuses on the education of children at schools and of the communities in general, including ethnic minority groups. The program focuses on sex related risks, reproductive health, gender, risk of human trafficking and sexual abuse and cover other topics as unsafe migration, domestic violence, life skills, use of drugs, etc.
What we focus on ?
Education & Prevention
Let me Aware
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AAT supports girls to have access to education or to continue their schooling. Victims rescued, girls considered at risk, daughters and young sisters of women involved in prostitution are the beneficiaries of this program.
What we support ?
protection
A school for me
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AAT regularly works with Ministries to advocate for a better future with governments. AAT’s advocacy is crucial for many laws and regulations applied in Thailand and Vietnam today.
What we advocate for ?
advocacy
better future
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Health support is an important mission of AAT. Most of our beneficiaries are supported for health examination and treatment and when it is available in their countries, they are covered by a health insurance.
What we do for health ?
health
i'm healty
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how we work
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The story of how we work
Where Dreams Bloom
Education for Prevention
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case stories
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AAT case on Human Trafficking on Surrogacy case in Thailand
Xuan. A Vietnamese trafficked in Malaysia
Girls perform a show about their own story (English captions)
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0 / year
Children raped in vietnam

Recent statistics of the Ministry of Social Affairs of Vietnam have revealed that over 1,000 children across Vietnam are sexually abused on a yearly basis, meaning that one child falls victim every eight hours.

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Vietnamese women and Girls Disappeared

from 2014 to 2017. They are between 15 and 36 years old. They were arrested in a country where they were trafficked and forced into prostitution. They were identified for repatriation by our network and then disappeared. We warning embassies, police and international organizations of this situation since years without any success.

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Our Ethical Principle and mission in Southeast Asia

We work with the aim of becoming unnecessary.
We treat all persons equally.
We don’t give false promises.
We cooperate with other organizations to ensure the best interest of the victims.
We don’t organize trips to see victims.
We never participate in sexual exploitation.
Protection of victims comes first.
We don’t sell pity.
We do not refer to prostitution as “sex work”.
We distribute information that we consider trustworthy.
Our Ethical-Principles

  • To educate girls against the risk of sexual exploitation.

  • To protect women and minors at risk and rescued from risks of sex exploitation and human trafficking or re-trafficking.

  • To advocate for better laws and regulations with governments, helping the building of a sustainable society.

  • To build positive attitude on gender issues through education campaigns in schools and in the community.

NETWORK

AAT is a regional network involving 7 partner countries and an international network with 17 countries worldwide.
Human Trafficking is without borders and requests a connection with partners from other countries.
In South East Asia, we are cooperating with local organizations based in six countries and direct actions in four of them.

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where we work

Explore the links and discover the work we do on the field

practice
vs
theory
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Explore our website
and contact us.
"like us" on our facebook
Thailand
Our actions
in
South East
Asia
Made in
Mekong
Vietnam
Ventiane, Laos
BE A CHANGEMAKER
Office in Ho CHi Minh City
Office in Bangkok City
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Prevention
Education
Vietnam
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COMIC STRIPS
PROJECT
COMIC
STRIPS PROJECT
COM
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RIPS
PRO
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COMIC STRIPS PROJECT
COMIC STRIPS
PROJECT
COMIC STRIPS
PROJECT
COMIC STRIPS PROJECT
COMIC
PROJECT
STRIPS
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Rescue
&
rescued
Some of Our awesome
TIP Heroes
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Nicolas Lainez:
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PHD Researcher & Photographer

French Network for Asian Studies International Conference
26-28 June 2017, Sciences Po.

Photo Display : A Matter of Time.

This series of images and texts provides a glimpse into prostitution, trafficking and AIDS in Southeast Asia. At the same time, it serves as a reflection on the nexus between photography and anthropology, photographic and ethnographic interactions.

Nicolas Lainez:
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I took this photograph of a teenager (left) of the Akha ethnic group visiting her mother (centre) in Tachilek, a town adjacent to Mae Sai, at the border between Myanmar and Thailand, in the Golden Triangle. At 14, she lives in the streets of Chiang Mai selling drugs and sexual services. In the picture, we see her boasting about the watch and the clothes her foreign “boyfriend” gave her. Like many images that attempt to portray prostitution, this picture does not show sex work, but a snippet of everyday life. As a result, it was not of interest to the media, NGOs, international organizations and donors that I approached to sell my photographs. It arouses little emotion and requires text to be understood. Above all, it diverts attention from the only issue that counts for many decision-makers, NGO workers and journalists: prostitution and the worst forms of exploitation and trafficking. This image, however, raises a central issue for prostitution in Southeast Asia, namely, the responsibility of families who depend on their children’s remittances. In order to overcome narratives of victimization, it is necessary to zoom out from prostitution itself so as to capture the social, economic and political structures that govern people’s lives. This undertaking comes at a price: a loss of appeal that many photographers and researchers are reluctant to pay. (Tachilek, Myanmar, 2003).

Nicolas Lainez:
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This photograph of a customer paying the price of a massage in a brothel in Phnom Penh is the culmination of several weeks of persuasion. I had to convince the brothel owner and her husband – a local policeman – to let me into their establishment, to allow me to approach each employee, to request permission to take photographs in increasingly private domains. This is how I was able to access the women’s clients before and after they procured sexual services. Only after a prolonged acquaintance was I able to capture this “decisive moment”. In fact, most images on prostitution are limited to images of women. In this photograph, I was able to bring together the three elements constituting the act of prostitution: the provider, the client and the objects of their transaction – that is, sex and money. The ethnographer also goes hunting for the “decisive moment”. Participatory observation involves sharing the respondent’s life, becoming involved in his/her activities and being accepted into his/her society. This method of immersion requires patience because most of the time spent in the field begins with administrative procedures, trivial discussions, repetitive interviews and anodyne observations. The ethnographer must be there when the incident occurs: when the mother who secretly prostitutes her daughter arranges the provision of a sexual service with her daughter’s client; when the police unexpectedly raid a brothel; or when a woman who has hidden her addiction pulls amphetamines from her bag. In photography as in ethnography, patience is key. (Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 2002).

Nicolas Lainez:

This photograph of a thirteen-year-old Vietnamese boy learning how to use a condom was taken at the Lotus Club, a drop-in centre for women and children engaged in prostitution in Svay Pak. Located eleven kilometres away from the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh, this village had two dozen brothels where hundreds of Vietnamese women and children sold sexual services. This image has a strong impact on the viewer as it reduces the existence of a child to the presumed suffering of his social and political condition. Yet, this picture is also comforting because it reproduces clichés on the most abusive and condemned forms of prostitution. In fact, it conceals more than it reveals: a shock of hair rather than a face, a social center rather than a brothel, a wooden phallus rather than a human penis. When it comes down to it, this image does not portray much. Instead, it provokes strong emotions and raises questions: who is this young boy? How did he arrive in Cambodia? Why has his family thrown him to the foreign “wolves” roaming the streets of Svay Pak? What does he feel about his foreign clients? And how does he perceive prostitution and the associated risks? The many questions that this image does not answer roused my curiosity about the subaltern, the representation of victims and the place of emotion in the global market of indignation. In turn, my political commitment was transformed into intellectual interest. This enabled me to overcome the limitations of the photographic gaze, the two-dimensional constraints of paper and the distorted framework of “human trafficking”, leading me to examine the intimate careers of Vietnamese sex workers in Southeast Asia. In other words, reflecting on images such as these propelled my transition from social reportage to social sciences (Svay Pak, Cambodia, 2002).

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Nicolas Lainez:
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This picture shows three Cambodian children posing at the entrance of a house in Poipet, at the border between Cambodia and Thailand. An international organization had repatriated them from Bangkok, where they had been arrested for child begging. The social workers who had introduced them to me painted a bleak picture: these naive and innocent children would have been hired out or sold by their parents to criminal networks to be exploited. By taking the testimony of the social workers as fact, I became trapped in their discourse, unable to verify its authenticity because of a lack of means and linguistic skills. In this case, although I mastered the art of photography, I was imprisoned by a prefabricated and simplistic narrative which supports the trafficking paradigm. I asked myself: how can we produce alternative and more complex stories? How are we to meet hidden populations without depending on social services organizations? How can we preserve independence in a sensitive context where access to information is problematic? How can we portray trafficking without falling prey to the narrative of victimization? How can we transcribe the messy realities of the world into informed images? Although the social sciences eventually enabled me to address these questions in a way that freed me from common assumptions, these issues continue to haunt me. (Poipet, Cambodia, 2003).

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